In money management, there’s a difference between automation and auto-pilot

By BOB CUNNINGHAM

My son is the worst about it of anyone I know.  You’d think that, being his old man writes about smart money management on a regular basis, he would be averse to such bad habits.  Nope.  Instead, he swipes or inserts his debit card to pay for things… and whatever balance his bank shows in his account at any given time – if and when he bothers to check – must be correct.

This folks, is referred to as money management on auto-pilot.  It’s not recommended.

In a neo-technical society, automation can be a great thing.  Banking apps are all the rage – just snap a photo of the check you want to deposit, complete a couple of clicks, and just like that you have made a deposit.  No need to venture out and walk up to an ATM, deal with a drive-thru, or (perish the very thought of it!) stand in line inside a branch.

But often, people confuse utilizing modern-day tools to assist noble efforts with a hands-off approach that, quite honestly, is just begging for problems.

You need to be on top of your money, gang.

So here is a quick breakdown of how you can utilize automation to your benefit, and what you should be willing to take the extra time required to do just to make sure you really are engaging in intelligent money management.

Use on-line banking…

Why wouldn’t you?  Like the trash-talking big guy proclaimed in the film, White Men Can’t Jump, to explain his sudden departure from the basketball court in the middle of a 2-on-2 tournament game he and his partner were dominating, “This is too easy!”

On-line banking allows you to quickly check your balance, see transactions, and the Bill-Paying feature lets you set up recurring payments on bills which are the same amount every month, such as your mortgage and car payments. You can also sign up directly with the vendor to get regular alerts for how much your bill is and when it’s due (ideal for utilities, for instance), go to your bill-pay page, and authorize payment in less than 30 seconds.

… But monitor it regularly

I go to my bank’s on-line site at least 3-4 times per week.  No, it isn’t because I’m obsessed with seeing a large balance.  Trust me, that isn’t applicable… not because my wife and I are poor – we’re doing fine – but because my regular bank account is used for paying bills and everyday expenses.  The bulk of our assets are located elsewhere, where they can earn a respectable rate of return.

I go there because I want to safeguard against two things – errors and oversights.  Errors are when someone charges you erroneously, or there is an error on the bank’s end (very rare, I have found).  Oversights are when it’s my fault – a charge I didn’t remember to account for, or perhaps a subscription auto-renew that I forgot about or didn’t want.

Simply put, I want to make sure the amount of money shown in our account is what should be shown.  Typically, the quicker mistakes are discovered, the easier they are to remedy.

Have your paychecks direct-deposited…

Many banks offer small incentives for agreeing to have your paychecks directly deposited regularly.  The perks can be fee-free basic accounts, discounts on loan rates, small cash-back considerations, even tangible gifts.  Nothing cozier than watching TV draped in a blanket with “Bank of Cucamonga” emblazoned.

Yeah, I’m kidding about the blanket.  Still, it is more convenient not to have to worry about physically possessing your check, getting to the bank to deposit it or cash it, etc.

…But know what’s being withheld from your net pay and why.

Don’t trust your employer with getting it right.  Be sure you concur with what is being withheld, how many hours you were credited with working, even the pay rate itself.  My other son recently took a new job, only to find out that he was being paid 75 cents an hour less than he thought he was promised.  And of course, he didn’t notice this until about a month in, making a correction (and retroactive reimbursement) more difficult to request and obtain.

Pay Yourself First:  Have money from your check sent directly to an investment account…

One of the oldest adages in personal finance, discussed numerous times on this site. “Pay yourself first” means that you set aside funds for savings before you pay any bills or cover any other expenses.  It assures you save, regardless of circumstances, which is especially critical when you are first starting out and have the maximum time to take advantage of the amazing principle of compound interest.

…And monitor your  balance to assure full credit and growth

Again, don’t trust that the powers that be will get everything right.  I once had a life insurance policy, for which I sent in a contribution toward what is referred to as a “payed-up additions rider,” which allows for growing your cash value more quickly provided you stay within certain parameters.  The insurance company mistakenly credited the payment toward a small policy loan balance I had, that I had just taken and wasn’t yet willing to pay on.

The error wasn’t a big deal, and was easily corrected by the company, but had I not caught it, it would have ultimately cost me money in the form of lost compounding on the funds which never would have reached my desired destination.

By all means, utilize the great modern technology available to us whenever you can, and it makes sense to you.  But whether you go old-school or new-tool, be “accountable” every step of the way.  Pun intended.

Thanks, as always, for reading.

***

DISCLAIMER:  This post represents the author’s opinions only.  In no way should any part of the content of this post be interpreted as official financial advice, nor does it represent an intention to solicit readers into a specific company or investment.  Results are never guaranteed.  Utilize the information as you see fit, make all money decisions at your own risk.

Ultimately, it’s all about retirement

By BOB CUNNINGHAM

On this website, and hundreds of others like it that I read and monitor, we talk about practically anything that has to do with money/personal finance.  And we should… there’s a helluva lot to cover about the subject.

But what it all boils down to, whether you’re in your 50s or half of that, is preparing for the “Big R.”  What proactive steps are you taking, now and in the near future, to properly prepare for retirement?

So let me ask you, is that what we should really focus on ad nauseum?

While planning for the long-term future is certainly important, I contend that excelling in the short-term, including the ‘now,’ is at least equally vital.  In fact, one often facilitates the other.

Maximizing your efficiency in saving and investing now, logically, will result in you having more money to work with later.

Let’s take a quick look at why planning for retirement has become such big business, cliff notes version.  You ready?  It’s because virtually all private companies have deserted the traditional pension system in favor of a 401K/IRA-led way of saving for one’s own career conclusion.  And, many public and government agencies appear headed in the same direction.

Sure… just save some money with your company in its 401K, or do it on your own with an Individual Retirement Account, combine those with the scraps that are our social security payouts – assuming those rates stay where they are now – and you’ll be set.  Who needs a big, fat monthly pension check when the S&P 500 historically averages a 10% annual return?

I’m tellin’ ya, it’s bananas.  And yet our society has fully accepted this monumental shift in monetary focus.  But what people fail to properly gauge is that, while $500,000 in a retirement account may sound like a butt-load of money, it is in fact barely enough to keep a retired couple above the poverty line.

Undoubtedly, you’ve heard that experts traditionally recommend drawing down your nest-egg at about 4% per year, so that you can live while retaining the full balance of your primary account.  In other words, if you start with $500,000, and want to leave a legacy, you should take annual withdrawals from that account of no more than 4%.

Really?  Hmmm… let’s see how that might play out.

Let’s say you’re an average wage-earner in the U.S., about to retire.  Your household income, says Betterment.com, is about $68,000 a year gross.  That’s roughly $50,000 net spendable money after taxes.

If you expect to maintain the same standard of living you’ve become accustomed to, you would have to have about $1.25 million saved.  And that’s not even considering the erosion caused by inflation.  At a 3 percent inflation rate, $50,000 of net spending power becomes just $25,000 in about 24 years, which is roughly the average length of retirement nowadays.

Of course, you can always sacrifice your kids’ inheritance and spend down your money – in fact, I think you should because it’s your money.  But try making $500,000 last 24 years when you’re taking $68,000 withdrawals on a taxable account.  According to calculators on the BankRate.com website, do that and you will be out of money in less than 15 years.

Your retirement account is a Roth IRA?  Cool.  No taxation on the withdrawals.  But with $50,000 annual withdrawals and inflation, your investments had better return more than 14% each and every year if you expect to continue paying the bills 24 years later.

Also, we didn’t enter increased medical expenses or anything else into the equation.  Scared yet?  Ya should be at least nervous.

So what do we do?  If we’re smart, we utilize specific strategies that take the guesswork out of money, and we start doing them now… to benefit us now, a little later, AND into retirement.  We do things that allow us to live a better, smarter life RIGHT NOW and over the ensuing years, and not just obsess about what we’re going to do when we actually get old.

And I have a strategy that makes all of this relatively simple and definitively painless.  Beginning in 2018, this website will be dedicated to detailing this approach and its various advantages on a regular basis.  Yep… I’m going to make you wait for it.

But, if you’ve been reading this blog for any length of time, you already know what I’m talking about.  DPWLI… to know what this acronym stands for, refer to earlier posts, and let me know your reaction to the suspense.

Yes, admittedly, I’m messing with my audience a little here.  But teasers are good, and it won’t be long now before the info will be at your fingertips.

In the meantime…  thanks, as always, for reading.

***

DISCLAIMER:  This post represents the author’s opinions only.  In no way should any part of the content of this post be interpreted as official financial advice, nor does it represent an intention to solicit readers into a specific company or investment.  Results are never guaranteed.  Utilize the information as you see fit, make all money decisions at your own risk.

Do you have to take risks to make a return on your money? Emphatically… No!

By BOB CUNNINGHAM

Greetings, all.  I’m tapping out this post from the Rio Hotel & Suites in Las Vegas.  I’m here to attend a convention – so it seems appropriate to discuss what some call the “Wall Street Casino.”

Essentially, what we’re talking about is the subject of risk.  More specifically, we want to ascertain why it has become common “knowledge,” that in order to get good returns, you have to be willing to take some risk.

There is some truth to that notion when you look at it from the risk perspective.  There are investments out there that are highly speculative. No one knows what’s going to happen, and folks don’t even have a decent idea of what’s going to happen even if they pretend they do.

And I’m not talking about investments that have a reputation as being risky, such as options trading, day trading, commodities, or even collectibles.  No, sir, I’m referring to that mainstream investment called the S&P 500 Index.

You may have heard of it.

Obnoxiousness aside, financial experts of all kinds will have you believe that investing in the stock market is the only legitimate way to earn good returns, and that if you do it right by conducting proper due diligence, diversify your portfolio, consult a professional, etc., you will most certainly be fine in the long run.

These know-it-alls love to cite that the S&P, which stands for Standard & Poor, has returned an average of about 10% annually since The Great Depression.  I’ve read multiple articles on-line and in print magazines, of late, suggesting you shouldn’t be wary of the potential for a sharp decline in the market such as what we experienced in 2008 and 2009 – even though we’re nearing a record-duration bull market as I write this – because even if it does drop sharply at some point, the market inevitably comes back and then some…

Pish posh.

Folks who saw their investment account balances drop 40% or more nearly a decade ago are just now catching up.  A few are showing a slight gain from pre-2008 levels, but projected as an annual return most would have been better off keeping their money under their Serta Perfect Sleeper.

And with retired people who are counting on taking an income from their investment assets, a volatile market can literally make them queasy because they’re not sure if they’re going to have enough money to do the things they want to do in their golden years.

By the way, that aforementioned 10 percent annual S&P growth is before taxes and fees, and your actual return isn’t 10% because you can only earn that if the market were to return exactly that percentage every year.  We’ve demonstrated multiple times on this site how average returns are a far cry from actual returns.  Here’s another quick example:

(Start with $1,000 account balance.  Earn 60% the first year, lose 50% the second. Your average annual return would be 5% (60 – 50 = 10, divided by 2 years), but your actual return is a 10% annual LOSS ($600 gain first year = $1,600 in account, 50% loss the second year = $800 loss – net result is $1,000 + $600 – $800 = $800 balance in account after the second year.  $1,000 – $800 = $200 loss is 20%, divided by 2 years = 10% loss per year).

Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a financial instrument in which you could store money safely, and still earn a respectable annual rate of return with virtually zero risk?  How sweet to fund it and forget it, knowing that you have a better chance of being struck by lightning – twice – than of losing with that account!

Dividend-paying whole life insurance.  Yes, we have introduced this product on this site, and I’ve written on it numerous times.  And in the coming weeks and months, this blog will adjust its focus from a general personal finance educational approach to a site dedicated to teach as many folks as will take the time to learn, the numerous benefits of utilizing life insurance “living benefits.”

It has to be the right kind of insurance, set up by properly trained agents representing carriers who have been established for more than a century.  But when you use this tool to hold your nest-egg, you will get the following:  Safety of principal and gains, a guaranteed rate of return that can be even higher depending on annual dividends, a structure that legally allows you to access your funds tax-free whenever you want, and a system available by some companies (but not all) that allows you to borrow funds from your cash value – without qualifying – and yet your full cash value continues to earn returns and grow as if you never took a loan at all.

It’s all about educating people.  Our public school system falls far short of any legitimate teaching about money or investments or retirement savings, so it’s up to citizens like myself who are passionate about people of all ages succeeding financially, for the short- and long-term.

Keep reading this space every week, friends.  We will continue to shed light on what is not only a desirable alternative to the gambling that investing in Wall Street and the money markets is, but also a critical undertaking we need to be aware of… NOW.

Thanks for reading.

***

DISCLAIMER:  This post represents the author’s opinions only.  In no way should any part of the content of this post be interpreted as official financial advice, nor does it represent an intention to solicit readers into a specific company or investment.  Results are never guaranteed.  Utilize the information as you see fit, make all money decisions at your own risk.

It may seem as if buying with cash is best, but don’t forget about opportunity cost

By BOB CUNNINGHAM

It is a common misconception that you should always pay cash on purchases.  Old-school thought on this is simple and straight-forward:  If you don’t have enough money on hand to pay the price, you can’t afford it and should save until you do.

Well, I’m here to tell ya that cash isn’t always king.  In fact, many times it is detrimental to your personal finances to pay cash for purchases.  And few people are as old-school as I am… or at least, as I like to think I am.

When you pay cash, there is this frequently overlooked factor called “opportunity cost.”  On small purchases, like a combo meal at Wendy’s, the opportunity cost is pretty doggone small.  But there is still an opportunity cost.

How does that work? Well, what if you use a cash-back credit card to buy your burger and fries? If the card pays 1% cash back, doling out a five and two ones instead of using the card just cost you about seven cents.

That’s $.07.  Not much, of course.  But if you buy lunch using the cash-back card five days a week, in a month you would have earned yourself $1.40, assuming you pay the credit card balance in full before the grace period of roughly three weeks expires.  That adds up over a year to nearly $17 – enough for two free lunches, super-sized.

It should be obvious by now that I’m not calling your attention to this for such small fried potatoes.  Instead, I’d like you to consider your next car purchase.  Let’s say the ride you want costs $25,000.  And for the sake of this discussion, let’s suppose you happen to have $25,000 saved and available.  It’s invested in a stock market index fund inside at an online brokerage account and has earned about 7% since you’ve had it.

Very smart of you to put that money to work, by the way.

Meanwhile, the car dealership is offering 2.9% financing on that sweet-looking sedan.  You have enough money to just pay cash for the car.   Your parents have always told you to pay cash.

Listen to your folks?  Or go into debt?

In my opinion, it’s a no-brainer… with all due respect to Mom and Dad.

If you opt to pay cash, you will have no car payments.  And that is, of course, a good thing.  It merits consideration, to be sure.  But that $25,000 is now tied up, and thus can’t be used for anything else unless you immediately turn around and sell the car (which if you did, you’d be lucky to get $20,000 because new cars depreciate as much as 30% the minute you drive them off the lot according to KBB.com).  So you’ve not only tied up the cash, but done so in a depreciating asset.

On the other hand, if you qualify for and accept the financing, and keep the $25K in the investment account, it would earn about $1,750 if it maintains a 7% rare of return (ROR) annually.  The spread of a 7% return over a 2.9% interest debt is a net positive 4.1%.  Mathematically, when the new car is paid off in five years, you will have netted a positive 20.5% (4.1% multiplied by 5 years).

Plus, you will still have the $25,000-plus if you need it for something else. It won’t be tied up in the formerly new wheels.

But hold on, you say.  What if we need to make the $449 per month car payment from that same $25,000 account?  OK… $449 times 12 = $5,388 in payments each year, with $388 of that being interest (we arrive at that by knowing the $25,000 cost of the car divided by five years equals $5,000 to principal per year, with the remainder being interest).  So in the first year, and the subsequent four years, you pay $388 in interest every 12 months.

But how much did the index fund money earn you?  The answer,  considering the dwindling balance as we make those monthly car payments, ends up at about $1,400.  That’s better than $1,000 more (the first year) to keep the cash and use it to make the payments as we go.  We aren’t considering income taxes in our figures, because you’d have to pay taxes on the gains of the $25K at withdrawal, whether all at once or a little at a time.

The major key to the comparison is the 4.1% separation between the interest rate being paid on the car loan and the ROR on the investment account.  Whether it’s the first year or the fifth, or anywhere in between, that spread is going to average out the same.*

*I’m not saying you can count on your cash to make a 7% return precisely, each and every year.  Of course that isn’t the case.  It might lose one year, but it also might make 30 percent gains the next.  Determining which strategy is the best requires us to use constants (averages) where they don’t typically exist.  If the investments in the account lose money in every one of the five years, then paying cash would have been better because we’ve lost that aforementioned spread.  But five straight losing years is extremely unlikely. Historically, four of the five will be gains with two of those being at least 10 percent. (source – Morningstar.com)

Finishing with our example utilizing a 7% annual return on the investment account, in five years using the auto financing to pay off the car in full, we would still have about $1,900 remaining in the account (according to BankRate.com calculators) to go with a paid-off car that is now worth roughly 10-12 grand.  Paying cash, you would still have a $10,000-$12,000 car… but the investment account would be fully depleted – immediately.

Look, nineteen hundred bucks versus zilch is a huge difference.   So remember – opportunity cost is a big factor to look at when considering whether or not to pay cash for a purchase.  For fast-food lunches, go ahead and use cash or your debit card.  But on the larger purchases, be sure to take advantage of credit IF the rate of return on your saved money exceeds what the creditor charges to loan you the funds.

As always, thanks for reading.

***

DISCLAIMER:  This post represents the author’s opinions only.  In no way should any part of the content of this post be interpreted as official financial advice, nor does it represent an intention to solicit readers into a specific company or investment.  Results are never guaranteed.  Utilize the information as you see fit, make all money decisions at your own risk.

Diversification: An often misunderstood term, and misused investment strategy

By BOB CUNNINGHAM

There are numerous commonly referenced words and expressions in the personal finance world, and truth be told, only a handful of them are utilized correctly.

One of the many you will hear frequently is ‘diversification.’  Most often, diversification refers to the cliche of “not putting all your eggs in one basket.” By diversifying in the investment world, you’re hedging some of your money against the possibility of poor returns in other parts of your portfolio.  You don’t invest all of your money in stocks, for example, but instead should diversify by putting part of your cash in bonds (because bonds tend to run opposite of stocks, although try telling that to those hurt the worst during the recession of nearly a decade ago, when the bottom fell out of both for a time).

Or, don’t just invest in equities.  Take part of it and go into real estate, or gold, or collectibles.  Or all of the above.  Each have their benefits and detriments, and together the idea is avoid too much exposure to one asset class in the event that the primary investment in question happens to tank.

Sounds reasonable enough, except for one thing.  Why do we really need to diversify?  Can’t we just invest conservatively in something that can’t go down, and sit back and enjoy steady, predictable growth?

We sure can, by using dividend-paying whole life insurance to hold and grow our nest-egg.  But this post isn’t specifically dedicated to insurance.  What I want to accomplish here is to illustrate why traditional, conventional saving and investing for retirement and other uses is actually counter-productive, and I’m going to use one of Wall Street’s favorite buzzwords to make my point.

Let’s say you’re convinced that the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index is about to hit the skids.  We have been blessed (?) with the long-running bull market of the modern era, but even the most optimistic of investment experts acknowledge that the run can’t last forever.  So how do you think they would react if you informed them that you believe the market is about to take a downturn, and that you’re going to exit your entire index fund and stay on the sidelines for a while, to see how it all shakes out?

“Well, uh, Mr. and Mrs. Investor, you can do that if you want to, of course, but the smart strategy would be to keep part of your money in the fund, so that you can remain diversified,” might be the reply.  “It’s impossible to know with any certainty what the market is going to do, and you don’t want to miss out on any additional growth.”

So you and your significant other counter by informing the broker that if you’re in cash temporarily, you can’t lose money except for the spending power decline due to inflation, and you don’t expect to stay away long enough for that hit to be anything that should truly matter.

“Well, if you’re uncomfortable staying with your current fund, perhaps you’d like to invest instead in our XYZ corporate bond fund?  But again, I advise you leave some of your investment dollars in the S&P,” retorts the broker.

“So you’re telling me to ignore my instinct and leave at least some money in there, so that my loss that I feel strongly is coming isn’t as significant and that I just might gain more?”

“Precisely.”

“In essence, then, it’s a coin toss… at best.”

“Well, as I said earlier, it’s impossible to know for sure what will happen.”

“Then it sounds to me like I’d be better off invested in something where I do know what will happen, even if the returns might be lower.”

“Well, uh.. um…”

PRECISELY. 🙂

You see, the basic concept of diversification is fine.  An index fund, by definition, IS diversifying because instead of investing in one or just a small group of stocks, you own a piece of every stock in the index, usually at least 50 or more.  In this fictional example, it’s the entire S&P and its 500 companies.

But investing strictly in the S&P doesn’t make much sense, because it’s still 100% in stocks and nothing else.

So what can you do to avoid this conundrum?  The aforementioned life insurance approach is the ticket.  Because you can’t lose money with this product (this assumes you purchase your coverage from one of the long-established, professional mutual carriers and not take a “discount policy” from “Larry’s Life and Health”), the need for diversification is essentially absolved.

Going this route, you invest in an instrument that will pay you a steady 4-6% net (after tax, because done correctly there is no tax) annually plus you will have a host of other advantages – living benefits – that include potentially tax-free access to at least 90% of your cash value at any time, non-qualifying loans that don’t have to be repaid AND allow your money to grow at the same rate as if you hadn’t borrowed, an asset that isn’t reported as one for income tax or estate purposes, and a strategy that is generally immune from lawsuits (seek licensed and appropriate legal counsel to assure this is correct where you live).

All of this, and a death benefit for your designated beneficiaries as well.  Now that’s what I call diversified advantages.

Thanks for reading.

***

DISCLAIMER:  This post represents the author’s opinions only.  In no way should any part of the content of this post be interpreted as official financial advice, nor does it represent an intention to solicit readers into a specific company or investment.  Results are never guaranteed.  Utilize the information as you see fit, make all money decisions at your own risk.

It’s time to review several things we’ve covered in past BWE posts – Part II

By BOB CUNNINGHAM

Continuing with the post from last week, in which we are examining some basic financial principles from a “fantasy and reality” perspective:

“Invest in your company’s 401K Plan.”  The most common workplace retirement savings vehicle is a 401K Plan, which is a qualified (i.e. government-sponsored) account in which the company holds your money and pays a brokerage to invest it for you into various securities.

FANTASY:   Max out your 401K Plan (the government places limits on how much you are allowed to contribute annually) as soon as you can.  The government is truly generous in allowing us an account that can grow tax-deferred.

REALITY:   Doing so means you’re trusting others to manage your money, in markets that are risky and volatile, and forfeiting access to your money until you’re age 59 1/2 (unless you want to pay a 10% penalty on top of standard taxation) and the account has been in existence at least five years.  It’s true that many companies offer a match up to a certain percentage of your income.  As a secondary retirement savings instrument, I’m fine with maximizing the company match (example – company matches 25% of the first 5% you have deducted from your paycheck to be put into your 401K).  Otherwise, there are better places to put your savings where you have safety and complete control. And once and for all:  Tax-deferred doesn’t mean tax-free, and it doesn’t result in more compiled money once you’ve paid income tax at the back-end.

“The most important aspect of investing is Rate of Return.” How much compound interest your money makes as it is invested in stocks, bonds, precious metals, real estate, or any other from among a host of investment choices IS something you’re going to want to track.  But there are other factors.

FANTASY:  You should be investing your money where you can earn the highest returns.  The stock market has risk, but it has gone up steadily over the long-term so if you leave your money in the markets, you’ll most certainly come out ahead.

REALITY:  I can’t quite recall where I first read the following, but the adage is oh-so accurate:  The most important part of savings and investing isn’t the return on your money.  It’s the return of your money.  I’ve never fully understood why otherwise sensible people have allowed themselves to become convinced that they should put their hard-earned life savings at significant risk.  In 2008-09, I personally knew folks who saw their nest-eggs drop by 40 percent.  They are just now fully recouping those losses, and that’s amidst the longest-lasting bull market in any of our lifetimes.  Remember, in a previous post we demonstrated how a 5% return every year can out-perform and average of 10 percent over the same period, in the same way that a 50% gain followed by a 50% loss results in a 25% net loss (Don’t believe me? Try it starting with $100 to make the math simple).  Slow and steady wins the race.  Just ask either the tortoise or the hare.  Better yet, ask them both.  Wouldn’t steady gains with no market risk – that’s zero risk, ladies and gentlemen – seem to be more intelligent when it comes to something as important as retirement savings? As opposed to hoping your funds return double-digits and avoid big declines along the way?  The answer is yes, because it is,

“Buy term and invest the difference.” This expression, of course, is referring to life insurance.  There two primary types – term and permanent.  Term insurance is solely a death benefit in exchange for a monthly (or annual) premium.  Permanent insurance includes products like whole life insurance, and can be set up to function in several capacities in addition to providing a death benefit.

FANTASY:  Because term is cheaper, it is advisable to buy term and then take the amount of money you’re saving on premiums versus permanent insurance and invest it in the stock market or other vehicle for long-term returns.

REALITY:  It sounds logical enough on its face, but two big problems here.  First, the vast majority of folks who intend to follow this strategy won’t “invest” the difference.  They will spend it… on stuff that depreciates.  And I simply don’t believe in unrealistic advice, even if the logic is sound (which it really isn’t here).  Secondly, there’s an obvious reason that permanent insurance tends to be more expensive than term.  IT DOES A LOT MORE FOR YOU!  Dividend-paying whole life, the product choice for permanent insurance suggested by this blog, offers a host of “living benefits” in addition to the fundamental death benefit.  The premiums are higher because the product is superior, on numerous levels. To recommend term strictly because it’s cheaper demonstrates a lack of reasonable research and comparison.

I hope you enjoyed this review and reaped some additional wisdom, or at least some reinforcement, from it.  Once again, thank you for taking time from your busy schedule to join us weekly on this site.

***

DISCLAIMER:  This post represents the author’s opinions only.  In no way should any part of the content of this post be interpreted as official financial advice, nor does it represent an intention to solicit readers into a specific company or investment.  Results are never guaranteed.  Utilize the information as you see fit, make all money decisions at your own risk.

 

It’s time to review several things we’ve covered in past BWE posts – Part I

By BOB CUNNINGHAM

(Note to my readers:  My apologies for being a day late with this post.  This marks a permanent change to Tuesday morning release of my new post each week.  The change is due primarily to professional convenience.  Thanks for your understanding.)

This website is, first and foremost, dedicated to coaching people how to best go about the various tasks related to savvy personal finance.  Achieving success can be accomplished through a mixture of some sound fundamental principles, combined with the reality that many strategies which are considered advisable by the masses are, instead, more beneficial to others.

What does that all mean?  Translated into one expression,

    “Unconventional wisdom, in many cases, is better than conventional.”

As you read, listen, watch, and research the world of personal finance, you will encounter some common themes preached by everyone from the most famous gurus to the tiniest out-of-the-mainstream blogs (I’d like to believe I’m somewhere in between, but closer to the latter than the former.)

This blog has been dedicated to assisting you in deciphering what to believe and trust, and what not to.  We’ve taken individual topics and broken them down into pieces small enough to digest in a way that allows us to effectively learn just how such habits can affect us, short- and long-term.

What I haven’t really done, until the paragraphs to follow today and next week, is put together a summary of the major points made through this blog’s seven months of existence.  So let’s get to it.  I’m calling this, “Personal Finance:  Fantasy and Reality.”  Part I is below, with Part II to run Oct 17.

“Pay Yourself First.”   This is arguably the most common adage in the world of money.  It simply means that you should set aside money for savings and/or investing before you earmark funds to pay your bills and for everyday expenses.  The theory, of course, is that if you get in the habit of doing this, you’re guaranteed to save more and anything is better than nothing.

FANTASY:  Saving even the smallest amount on a regular basis will eventually lead to significant holdings, from which you can build on additionally.

REALITY:  While it’s true that something is always better than nothing, there has to be a definitive goal for increasing savings regularly, and it should only be undertaken after expensive personal debt, such as credit cards that can have APRs well more than 20 percent, is eradicated.  One of the most common mistakes is to save slowly in an account earning less than 1% while simultaneously carrying a balance on a credit card charging 23.9% interest compounded.  Spend every extra dime paying off the card, stop charging stuff unless you pay it off entirely by the due date, and THEN ratchet up the savings to blow away what you would have accumulated – and wasted – otherwise.

“You need to save at least 3 to 6 months of living expenses in an emergency account.”  The idea is that if you have this kind of a reserve, loss of your job for an extended period won’t put you in the poorhouse – or worse, your parents’ basement.

FANTASY:  This is one of my favorite finance fables.  Some pretty well-known gurus claim it’s better to have a year’s worth saved.  Sure, and it would be better if my retirement savings had one or two additional zeroes, too.  In truth, for 95% of the population on this planet it is a complete fantasy to have a liquid cash reserve of $10,000 or more and be willing to leave it alone for a rainy day.  There’s a better HD television available.  It’s an emergency!!

REALITY:  A much savvier plan is a basic reserve fund of $1,000-$2,000 for things such as auto repairs.  But actually, I propose to use your credit cards as your emergency fund.  As long as you’re disciplined – and let’s face it, discipline is required when utilizing any type of advisable strategy – you can use a credit card to charge a true emergency and then formulate a plan to pay off the card with minimal damage.  Saving more than the aforementioned $1K-$2K means you’re not utilizing legitimate funds properly.  You should be investing those funds in debt elimination, or a dividend-paying whole life insurance policy, or if you must, low-cost index funds, or even in your work’s 401K plan (more on that next week).  All are preferable to letting inflation eat away at the buying power of a tidy sum dedicated to nothing… and earning next to nothing in a regular savings account.

“Avoid credit cards.”  Because they are debt instruments, many gurus advise to ignore them entirely, except perhaps for one card that can be used only in a “true emergency.”

FANTASY:  Just pay cash for everything, and you won’t need cards.  Credit cards only benefit the companies who issue them.  They victimize their customers unfairly.

REALITY:  Credit cards are great, but ONLY when used wisely and properly.  Running up a balance on an account charging such high interest rates is fiscal mutilation.  But if you are able to obtain 3-4 cards, each with cash-back allowances (preferably in rotating categories offering as high as 5%), and you use them for everyday regular expenses while ALWAYS paying off the entire balance prior to the next minimum payment being due, you not only avoid unnecessary costs, but also accrue small refunds, and at the same time build a favorable credit history.  Plus, your purchase of tangible goods are often insured by the card company, a service not provided by cash or a debit card.

“When strategically paying off credit card debt, pay off the smallest balance first.” As opposed to eliminating the account with the highest APR, many financial advisers propose the “snowball” strategy versus the “avalanche” approach.

As the AFLAC duck often exclaims, “Huh??”

FANTASY:  Paying off your smallest balances first, before working on the larger ones, yields quicker results and gives you a sense of accomplishment. This increases your chances of sticking with the program.

REALITY:  I won’t argue with psychology because I’m not educated in that area beyond my Psych I college course explaining the difference between Sigmund Freud’s id, ego, and superego.  But our goal is to save money on interest, so why would I pay off an account charging 16% before one jacking me for 24%?  The latter is going to require a larger minimum payment, so I want that one outta-here ASAP.  Look, if you have two accounts of very similar rates (like, within 1% of each other) and you choose the smaller one in order to get rid of it quicker, knock yourself out.  But don’t leap over dollars for psychological nickels.  Just dedicate yourself to the task with the knowledge that it is what is best for your long-term financial health, and save every dollar you can.

That’s it for Part I.  See ya next week for the conclusion of our review.

As always, thank you for reading.

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DISCLAIMER:  This post represents the author’s opinions only.  In no way should any part of the content of this post be interpreted as official financial advice, nor does it represent an intention to solicit readers into a specific company or investment.  Results are never guaranteed.  Utilize the information as you see fit, make all money decisions at your own risk.

Earning more income these days? That’s great, but be willing to spend less anyway!

By BOB CUNNINGHAM

One of the more common mistakes that folks make regarding personal finance, especially you younger adults, is to believe that getting a raise at work should equate to raising your standard of living.

The smart money managers don’t think that way.

The common mindset for those who simply haven’t yet fully embraced the idea of getting ahead financially, rather than merely keeping up, is to dedicate those extra dollars into new and improved personal benefits… a more spacious crib (I’m so street), a nicer ride, new clothes, or whatever… rather than the simple step of increasing the amount you save every month.

Worse, many still aren’t saving yet and are spending all (or more) of their income, whether it increases or not.

Now please, don’t get me wrong.  If you earn a substantial raise at work (or even a modest one), there’s nothing wrong with a little celebration – going out to a nice dinner, or maybe a splurge on a new outfit not available at Ross Dress For Less.  You probably worked hard to earn that pay increase, and you should feel fine about enjoying the fruits of your labor… to a point.

If, however, you’re the type who figures out that your monthly take-home just went up by $75, and you’re trying to determine which additional expense you can afford, that you couldn’t before, you’ll never really get ahead monetarily.

If you’ve been paying attention to this blog for any length of time, you will know that I am not a proponent of the live-below-your-means philosophy, but I only feel that way in that I believe saving should not be considered part of the means formula.

To clarify, I’m saying that savings should come off the very top (remember, always “pay yourself first,”), before your means is determined.  If you do that, then it’s fine to live right up to your means, provided you don’t go over it by running up debt or doing something else ill-advised.

Of course, a common response to this is “that sounds all well and good, Bob, but I don’t have any money to spare. I’m barely getting by.”  It’s the most common refrain by a wide margin – people simply refuse to believe there’s anything in their current routine that they can go without, but when I press them about how often they eat out (including fast food), shop for goodies on-line, have coffee at the local coffeehouse, or go to the movies, their answers inevitably range from “occasionally,” to “well, a person has to live.”

Sure they do.  But when you eat fast food, can you focus on the joint’s budget menu rather than get the $8 No. 1 combo?  Couldn’t you simply spend less time thinking of crap you want to buy at Amazon or Overstock.com? Can you settle on a Tall rather than a Venti?  Might you go see a flick during the daytime and pay matinee prices?

And then they get a raise, and they start eating out more, frequenting Starbucks twice as often, add E-Bay to their binge shopping, and see movies they liked a second time, under the premise that “I can afford it.  I just got a raise.”

How about, instead, increasing your savings… and potentially knocking several years off your working life that can be added to your retired life?  I don’t know about you, but why in the heck would anyone work until they’re 65, when the ability to retire 10-15 years sooner (or even earlier) is available?  They like their work?  Great… they should put themselves in a position to dictate EXACTLY how much they do, how often, for whom, etc. by making income a non-factor.

To summarize, you don’t have to go without basic needs and a few wants in order to be smart with your money.  But if you’re not saving something every month without questioning it – preferably, at least 10 percent of your take-home pay – and committing it before you pay any of your expenses, you’re missing the financial boat.

If your tendency is toward spending instead of saving, you have a decision to make.  Have a little more fun now.  Or, with the amazing power of compound interest, have a lot more fun later… both in quality and increased number of years you can worry about playing instead of working.

Then, your next raise won’t matter.  Thanks for reading.

***

DISCLAIMER:  This post represents the author’s opinions only.  In no way should any part of the content of this post be interpreted as official financial advice, nor does it represent an intention to solicit readers into a specific company or investment.  Results are never guaranteed.  Utilize the information as you see fit, make all money decisions at your own risk.

Now that you know dividend-paying whole life insurance is the answer, here’s why…

By BOB CUNNINGHAM

Last week, I made the pronouncement that THE best thing you can do with your savings and investment dollars is to put them into a certain type of dividend-paying, whole life insurance.  I referred to the features and benefits of such policies, to illustrate why I have come to feel so strongly positive about these products.

But some additional perspective might be helpful, in the form of direct comparisons to the government-sponsored, conventional approaches promoted by so many self-proclaimed personal finance experts today.  (Remember, I am NOT an expert… but I am a licensed life insurance agent in California and, at the risk of coming across as full of myself, somewhat more knowledgeable in this area than most because I’ve studied this subject for most of the last decade, and I’m a graduate of SOHK – the School of Hard Knocks).

Okay, so why whole life insurance?  Here’s a breakdown:

Reason No. 1:  These policies offer clients virtually zero risk.  You’ll notice the word ‘virtually’ in there.  OK, technically, the insurance company that accepts your money and writes your policy could go out of business.  Any entity can.  But insurance companies rarely fail.  According to consumer research firm A.M. Best, less than 0.6 percent of life insurance companies have gone bankrupt outright since 1950.  Only a handful more had issues serious enough to require a take-over.  Some might point to conglomerate AIG and its need for a bailout about a decade ago.  But the equities investment arm of that company is what was on the brink of failure, not insurance.

And consider this:  If an insurance company does go down, the Guaranty Association will “insure the insured,” covering your cash values up to a certain figure and percentage.  Values and coverage vary depending on size, age of the policy, etc. but according to the California Department of Insurance, 80% of the cash value or death benefit (whichever applies) is paid typically.

Also, only a few of the more than 2,000 insurance companies nationally offer the specific types of dividend-paying whole life insurance that works best for this approach.  Stick to a company you’ve heard of and, well, your risk of losing your money is infinitely less than having it stuffed under your mattress at home.

Reason No. 2:  YOU control your own money at all times.  According to Douglas Andrew, the author of several pioneering personal finance books including his most famous, Missed Fortune, the most important characteristics shared by truly astute investments are:  safety, liquidity, and a rate of return.  He also adds tax-favored status as a factor that separates wise investments from the rest.

No. 1 above covered the aspects of safety, and the second point is the idea that you can access your money pretty much whenever you need it.  That is a seemingly basic but actually uncommon and invaluable control.  Conventional methods, such as saving in your company’s 401K Plan or in an Individual Retirement Account (IRA), immediately restrict you from your own funds unless you’re willing to pay penalties.  With both 401Ks and Traditional IRAs, you pay a 10% penalty plus the full income tax hit if you try to get at your money before age 59 1/2 and/or if the account has been open less than five years.  In a Roth IRA, you can pull out your contributions if you wish, but not the gains without the aforementioned extra costs.

And, with the 401K and Traditional IRA, you also have a problem on the back-end. Even if you prefer not to, the government has a minimum required distribution clause – fully taxed, of course – beginning at age 70 1/2.  If you don’t take it, Uncle Sam will make the withdrawal for you and penalize you on top of taking the taxes due.  That, my friends, is complete LACK of control… of YOUR money!

Reason No. 3:  Your money gets a guaranteed and steady rate of return, with no chance for loss.  The normal basic ROR is 4-5%, plus any dividends paid out.  Dividends aren’t guaranteed, but the companies that specialize in these special whole life policies have literally paid out dividends every year going back more than a century.  Refer back to previous posts about the importance of steady annual returns versus the volatile nature of traditional investments such as stocks and bonds.  Losing money hurts more than gains help. With these policies, you simply don’t lose money, regardless of what the markets do, domestically or internationally.

Still, I must ask… could you invest your money elsewhere and possibly earn a better return?  Of course, but consider that the government programs littered with Wall Street mutual funds and other similar products often carry with them high fees as well as no guarantee of any return at all (and thus, no downside protection).  Insurance companies have some associated fees as well, true, but those are already factored into the return and dividends – and made known to you up front – rather than subtracted from the end results. And they are typically lower than the fees charged inside a 401K Plan, notes Tony Robbins in his personal finance best-seller of a few years ago, Money: Master The Game.

Reason No. 4:  Tax-free access, bay-bee.  This advantage is often the most misunderstood, so let me clarify.  Any monies you’ve paid in as premiums into a whole life policy, as well as dividends earned, can be withdrawn from the policy free of income tax.  Any other funds accrued in the cash value can be accessed through policy loans.  Loan proceeds are never taxable.

And although there are those who think the government intends to eliminate that last feature from these products, such talk has purportedly been going on for decades and nothing’s come of it.  Plus, if the law did change it would almost certainly affect only future policies not yet written, not current ones already on the books.

Reason No. 5:  The policy can include a feature that allows your cash value nest egg to grow even if you borrow from it, as if you didn’t borrow at all.  That sounds too sweet to be factual, but it’s completely true and actually pretty straight-forward.  Written properly, these policies allow for this huge benefit because the loan proceeds come from the insurance company’s general fund, NOT the actual cash values of the clients.  The cash values are just the collateral, thereby allowing them to stay in place and grow as if no loan had been taken against them at all.

So imagine having $25,000 built up in the cash value of your policy and you want a new car.  You can borrow the funds from the insurance company (without qualifying – just request it, and the money will be made available to you in a few days), and the $25K will still be accruing the guaranteed ROR plus be part of how your potential dividend is determined.

You are charged interest on the loan, usually about 5%, but with the roughly matching rate of return, the loan is costing you a net of nothing.  And, you can choose the terms for paying it back.  You can even decide NOT to pay it back if you wish.  If the insured individual dies, and there are unpaid loans on the books, the loan balance is simply deducted from the death benefit before it is awarded to the policy’s beneficiary.  It should be noted that for most financial planning strategies involving whole life insurance, it is recommended that policy loans be repaid.

With all these valuable advantages – and truthfully, I’ve only touched on the most basic benefits – it’s hard to imagine anyone choosing instead to let the government control his or her funds.  But that choice remains out there and selected by a whole host of folks, most of which simply have no idea that the proper kind of life insurance has living benefits rather than just a death benefit and is far superior to traditional approaches to saving and investing.

Continue to consider all your choices, and be savvy… because you CAN Build Wealth Early!  Thanks for reading.

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DISCLAIMER:  This post represents the author’s opinions only.  In no way should any part of the content of this post be interpreted as official financial advice, nor does it represent an intention to solicit readers into a specific company or investment.  Results are never guaranteed.  Utilize the information as you see fit, make all money decisions at your own risk.

Dividend-paying whole life insurance: The best financial strategy available today

By BOB CUNNINGHAM

Since establishing this personal finance blog last spring, I’ve alluded to a superior approach for allowing anyone to save money in a way that allows for maximum safety, a respectable rate of return that is free of income taxes, and the liquidity to access the funds that build up – plus have those funds continue to earn interest for you even while utilizing the money for purchases simultaneously.

But while I’ve touched on these different factors… given you varied teasers, if you will… I haven’t gone into much detail about the strategy of using properly-structured, dividend-paying whole life insurance as your primary savings vehicle.  And there’s a couple of different reasons for that.  1) I wanted to focus primarily on basic financial principles with this blog, because they aren’t taught with any degree of consistency but should be, with the idea that using the strategy I’m about to uncover is more of an advanced approach,  and 2) Even though I’m a licensed insurance agent in California, I’m still learning about the specifics of this technique and its plethora of “living benefits” to go along with the traditional death benefit.

In previous posts, we’ve covered the evils of government-sponsored investment/savings programs such as workplace 401Ks, Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs), and 529 Plans for college education expenses.  I explained how your lack of control over these instruments can subject your money to avoidable taxation, often ridiculously high fees, and an inconvenient (and needless) inaccessibility to your own funds.

We’ve also delved into the high-risk nature of investing in Wall Street via the equity markets; buying and selling real estate; commodities; collectibles; and just about anything else that will allegedly rise in value over time.

Despite the realities just mentioned in the preceding two paragraphs, the substantial majority of Americans continue to follow the herd and put virtually all of their hard-earned monies into these conventional accounts while holding their collective breaths wishing for steady appreciation and hoping not to get killed by taxes.

Why??????????????

Simply answered, because no one has ever bothered to show them a better alternative.  We hear, see, or read folks who purport to be personal finance “experts” (Suze Orman, Dave Ramsey, David Bach to name three) claiming the conventional, government-controlled approaches are the only way to go and assume what they’re pitching must make sense… because we simply don’t know any other way.  These personalities tend to black-ball permanent insurance (of which whole life is a type), criticizing what they don’t know enough about and, frankly, likely have never taken the time to truly investigate.

So, myself and many who have preceded me have decided we will be the voices (or written words) of reason, truth, and logic.

And on that note, and without further adieu, allow me to briefly detail the advantages of utilizing the proper type of dividend-paying whole life insurance:

Enjoy an immediate death benefit, while building a nest-egg you can access anytime you want.  When you open the right type of whole life insurance policy, your pre-determined death benefit is good from the first day in the event something happens to you (or whomever is the insured on the policy), and at the same time you begin building cash value that you can access whenever you want – no waiting until age 59 1/2 to avoid penalties like there is with the government -sponsored programs.

To be fair, the Roth IRA will allow you to withdraw your contributions at any time without having to pay taxes or a penalty, but that doesn’t apply to any gains the account may have made.  With the whole life policy, you can access virtually all of your account with the right approach (either via withdrawal or non-qualifying policy loan).  Refer to your individual agent for guidance on how to accomplish this.

Know, within a reasonable level of certainty, how much money you can build over a given period of time at essentially no risk.  Although dividends are not guaranteed, the companies that issue the type of policy I am referring to here have enjoyed profits (and, therefore, dividends paid to policy owners) for well more than 100 CONSECUTIVE years.  According to Pamela Yellen at www.BankonYourself.com, these companies have profited every single year since before 1900 – that includes during The Great Depression, times of war, The Crash of 1987, and the recession we endured about a decade ago.

Utilize the unique advantage of borrowing against your policy’s cash value, while it continues to grow as if you had never touched the funds.  That’s because you don’t.  Set up properly, these policies allow for the loan proceeds to come from the insurance company’s general fund, with your cash value as collateral, meaning that the cash value itself stays in place and continues to work for you, earning a rate of return plus dividends.

Loans are tax-free, and don’t have to be paid back on a schedule, or at all if you choose. The flexibility of this type of account is unheard of.  You want to borrow from your cash value?  Just let the insurance company know how much you need.  And although a sensible, long-term financial plan utilizing these policies as retirement vehicles compels you to repay these loans (pay yourself back at a lower-than-market interest rate), you are NOT required to do so.  Any unpaid loan balances still in effect at the time of the insured’s death simply results in that owed money being deducted from the impending death benefit.

In the coming weeks, we will cover more features – in more detail.  Bottom line, you should be excited about what I’m introducing to you here.  This immaculate alternative to conventional investing will greatly simplify your financial life, and benefit you multiple times over on multiple levels.

Until next time, thanks as always for reading.

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DISCLAIMER:  This post represents the author’s opinions only.  In no way should any part of the content of this post be interpreted as official financial advice, nor does it represent an intention to solicit readers into a specific company or investment.  Results are never guaranteed.  Utilize the information as you see fit, make all money decisions at your own risk.