Dividend-paying whole life insurance: The best financial strategy available today

Since establishing this personal finance blog last spring, I’ve alluded to a superior approach for allowing anyone to save money in a way that allows for maximum safety, a respectable rate of return that is free of income taxes, and the liquidity to access the funds that build up – plus have those funds continue to earn interest for you even while utilizing the money for purchases simultaneously.

But while I’ve touched on these different factors… given you varied teasers, if you will… I haven’t gone into much detail about the strategy of using properly-structured, dividend-paying whole life insurance as your primary savings vehicle.  And there’s a couple of different reasons for that.  1) I wanted to focus primarily on basic financial principles with this blog, because they aren’t taught with any degree of consistency but should be, with the idea that using the strategy I’m about to uncover is more of an advanced approach,  and 2) Even though I’m a licensed insurance agent in California, I’m still learning about the specifics of this technique and its plethora of “living benefits” to go along with the traditional death benefit.

In previous posts, we’ve covered the evils of government-sponsored investment/savings programs such as workplace 401Ks, Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs), and 529 Plans for college education expenses.  I explained how your lack of control over these instruments can subject your money to avoidable taxation, often ridiculously high fees, and an inconvenient (and needless) inaccessibility to your own funds.

We’ve also delved into the high-risk nature of investing in Wall Street via the equity markets; buying and selling real estate; commodities; collectibles; and just about anything else that will allegedly rise in value over time.

Despite the realities just mentioned in the preceding two paragraphs, the substantial majority of Americans continue to follow the herd and put virtually all of their hard-earned monies into these conventional accounts while holding their collective breaths wishing for steady appreciation and hoping not to get killed by taxes.

Why??????????????

Simply answered, because no one has ever bothered to show them a better alternative.  We hear, see, or read folks who purport to be personal finance “experts” (Suze Orman, Dave Ramsey, David Bach to name three) claiming the conventional, government-controlled approaches are the only way to go and assume what they’re pitching must make sense… because we simply don’t know any other way.  These personalities tend to black-ball permanent insurance (of which whole life is a type), criticizing what they don’t know enough about and, frankly, likely have never taken the time to truly investigate.

So, myself and many who have preceded me have decided we will be the voices (or written words) of reason, truth, and logic.

And on that note, and without further adieu, allow me to briefly detail the advantages of utilizing the proper type of dividend-paying whole life insurance:

Enjoy an immediate death benefit, while building a nest-egg you can access anytime you want.  When you open the right type of whole life insurance policy, your pre-determined death benefit is good from the first day in the event something happens to you (or whomever is the insured on the policy), and at the same time you begin building cash value that you can access whenever you want – no waiting until age 59 1/2 to avoid penalties like there is with the government -sponsored programs.

To be fair, the Roth IRA will allow you to withdraw your contributions at any time without having to pay taxes or a penalty, but that doesn’t apply to any gains the account may have made.  With the whole life policy, you can access virtually all of your account with the right approach (either via withdrawal or non-qualifying policy loan).  Refer to your individual agent for guidance on how to accomplish this.

Know, within a reasonable level of certainty, how much money you can build over a given period of time at essentially no risk.  Although dividends are not guaranteed, the companies that issue the type of policy I am referring to here have enjoyed profits (and, therefore, dividends paid to policy owners) for well more than 100 CONSECUTIVE years.  According to Pamela Yellen at www.BankonYourself.com, these companies have profited every single year since before 1900 – that includes during The Great Depression, times of war, The Crash of 1987, and the recession we endured about a decade ago.

Utilize the unique advantage of borrowing against your policy’s cash value, while it continues to grow as if you had never touched the funds.  That’s because you don’t.  Set up properly, these policies allow for the loan proceeds to come from the insurance company’s general fund, with your cash value as collateral, meaning that the cash value itself stays in place and continues to work for you, earning a rate of return plus dividends.

Loans are tax-free, and don’t have to be paid back on a schedule, or at all if you choose. The flexibility of this type of account is unheard of.  You want to borrow from your cash value?  Just let the insurance company know how much you need.  And although a sensible, long-term financial plan utilizing these policies as retirement vehicles compels you to repay these loans (pay yourself back at a lower-than-market interest rate), you are NOT required to do so.  Any unpaid loan balances still in effect at the time of the insured’s death simply results in that owed money being deducted from the impending death benefit.

In the coming weeks, we will cover more features – in more detail.  Bottom line, you should be excited about what I’m introducing to you here.  This immaculate alternative to conventional investing will greatly simplify your financial life, and benefit you multiple times over on multiple levels.

Until next time, thanks as always for reading.

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DISCLAIMER:  This post represents the author’s opinions only.  In no way should any part of the content of this post be interpreted as official financial advice, nor does it represent an intention to solicit readers into a specific company or investment.  Results are never guaranteed.  Utilize the information as you see fit, make all money decisions at your own risk.

Focusing too much on Rate of Return can result in long-term costly mistakes

So many people who I talk to about personal finance and investing are obsessed almost exclusively with what the interest return is on their money, referred to as Rate of Return (ROR), without truly considering the risks involved.

And too many people assume that the stock market, real estate, and other forms of investing will always create wealth in the long run.  While it’s true that most accepted financial instruments have gone up over differing time periods in history, the assumption that it will always continue to do so, under all circumstances, is both ignorant and foolhardy.

Just ask the tens of millions of folks who saw their investments shrink by as much as 70 percent during the downturn that occurred in both stocks and real estate less than a decade ago.

Putting your money into the stock market or real estate can be a boon, sure.  But there are major downsides.  It’s gambling for all intents and purposes, and therefore doesn’t strike me as the smartest thing we can do with our life savings, the funding of retirement, attempting to pay for college tuition for our kids, etc.

Consider this.  As I have demonstrated in a previous post (or two), average ROR isn’t the same as the actual return you get.  If you have Investment A which earns exactly a 10% annual return over, say, five years, the average ROR for that time frame is, indeed, 10%.  Likewise, if you have the following results over a five-year span:  up 20%, down 35%, up 40%, down 5%, and up 30%, you have an average annual ROR of 10% as well (the five annual figures add up to a positive 50%, divided by five years equals 10% per year).

But when it comes to the actual numbers, the first scenario – 10% each and every year for the five years – gives you about $1,552 if you started the stretch with a $1,000, while the second scenario leaves you with just $1,348 – more than $200 less!!  How can this be?  It’s because losses hurt more than gains help.

Let me illustrate that point with a question:  If you have $100, and you lose 50% the first year and gain 50% the second, you should be back to an even $100, right?  If you bit and said yes, it’s because you didn’t take the time to do the math.  Fifty percent of $100 lost the first year leaves you with $50, followed by a 50% gain the second year which results in your account balance being $75 (50% of $50 is $25, added to the $50 = $75).

Your net return was zero, yet you lost 25 bucks!  Mathematical fact of life, my friends.

The actual stats can be confusing, I realize, but don’t miss the inclusive point, which is that steady gains are more valuable than big years followed by significant declines, or losses followed by gains, or the two inter-mixed.

Everybody has been told that you need to have your money invested in the stock market, which can be most easily achieved if your job offers a 401K Plan, and if not you can open up an investment account or an individual retirement account, and get your money in the market that way.  Now tell me, after what I have demonstrated above, are you really sure that’s the way you want to go?

As the expression goes, “there’s got to be a better way.”

Well, folks, there is.  I’ve alluded to it, but not delved deeply, in previous posts.  We’re talking about the proper type of cash value, dividend-paying whole life insurance.  It’s the strategy of many of the country’s wealthiest individuals, but it is a game-plan that those of more modest means can utilize effectively.  It has numerous benefits, some that will really blow your mind (as they did mine when I first learned about this concept) with no significant downside.

Next week, I will write a more detailed (but fundamental) explanation of how the correct type of whole life insurance can replace any and/or all of your other financial and investment instruments.

For now, here’s a teaser benefit:  You can know within about 90% accuracy how much money your policy will build, in advance, based on a fixed ROR combined with annual dividends that, while not guaranteed, have been paid out every single year for the last CENTURY by the top companies who specialize in these types of policies.  And all the while, your money isn’t invested in the ultra-volatile stock market, and so you’re not dependent on its whims.

Seriously, this stuff is really cool.  I look forward to going into more detail next week.  Until then, as always, thanks for reading.

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DISCLAIMER:  This post represents the author’s opinions only.  In no way should any part of the content of this post be interpreted as official financial advice, nor does it represent an intention to solicit readers into a specific company or investment.  Results are never guaranteed.  Utilize the information as you see fit, make all money decisions at your own risk.

Neither consolidation nor settlement is wisest for those seeking debt elimination

You’ve seen the ads plastered all over the internet:  “Pay off your debts for a fraction of what you owe!,” or “Consolidate your credit card debt into one, easy monthly payment.”

When you’re deep in debt, credit card debt in particular, it’s easy to fall into the trap of seeking easy answers to suddenly and miraculously rid yourself of that burden.  Paying off four and even five figures worth of debt can be daunting, and seemingly impossible to achieve.  But as someone who has been there, I can tell you without reservation that you CAN do this on your own, and by avoiding the temptation for radical shortcuts, you WILL be much better off in the long run.

Before we go further, let’s make two separate but related points.  1) There is a moral, ethical obligation to pay all of an owed debt.  You borrowed the money, you should be willing to pay it back 100 percent (plus reasonable interest), 2) We will not be discussing bankruptcy here, because that is literally NEVER your best option, regardless of what some attorneys claim.#

#To reinforce my disclaimer that comes at the bottom of every post I write, this statement is an opinion only, and is NOT intended to be taken as specific legal advice.  I am a financial coach and licensed life insurance agent. I’m not an attorney.

There are, however, two somewhat radical yet more industry-accepted measures that can be taken for those in deep debt:  Debt Consolidation, and Debt Settlement.

Consolidation refers to hiring a company which specializes in the reduction and eventual elimination of unsecured debt.  The company helps you organize your debts and can negotiate on your behalf with the credit card companies for reduced interest rates, 0% periods to help you pay your debt down more quickly, and can arrange to take in your payments and then forward negotiated payments directly to the creditors.  Let’s be clear:  Consolidation companies help you with something you can readily do on your own, and charge you a monthly fee for the service.  But in certain circumstances, they can be of some assistance.

However, there are two primary negatives with working with a consolidation company.  First, as I just indicated, they’re not really providing any service that you couldn’t do on your own with a little effort.  You can call your creditors and ask for rate reductions, or request to have payments lowered and spread over a longer time frame in an effort to stay current.

The second downside is that signing up with such a company usually will be reported on your credit report, and can take as long as seven years – from the date of your final payment made to/through the consolidation company – before it is expunged from your record.  This information can lower your score and, thus, make it more difficult to qualify for more beneficial types of financing such as a home mortgage.

In most instances, consolidation is unnecessary and not helpful enough to justify the price – in terms of the monthly fee (typically $35-$75 monthly) or the detrimental credit hit.

Debt settlement is a much more aggressive strategy in which you’re essentially hiring lawyers to negotiate discounted settlements of the debt.  Say you owe Capital One $8,000, and you have no feasible way of keeping up with the minimum payments, and certainly no chance of paying more than the minimum in order to pay the balance off anytime soon.  The company might approach Capital One on your behalf and offer to pay a flat $4,000 within the next 30 days in order for the entire debt to be forgiven.  This is referred to, should Capital One agree in our example, as a “charge-off.”

Hold on!, you may be saying.  You’re telling me I can pay off an $8,000 debt for just $4,000?  Where do I sign?

Yes, it may sound like a Godsend, until you really peek under the hood of how this engine functions.  First off, where are you going to get the $4K to pay off the account within 30 days?  If you’re hoarding cash, you should have already used it to pay down your debt.  Assuming you don’t have that kind of scratch available, you’d have to turn around and borrow it from someone else.  How, in the name of sound financial planning, does that eliminate debt?

Another problem is that in most cases, and depending on the state where you live, that $4,000 “discount” on what you owe is recorded as income for you for tax purposes.  You would be liable for income tax on $4,000 at the end of the fiscal year… on money you never actually saw.  Be sure to consult with an accountant or tax attorney for specific details on your situation.

And the settlement company needs to get paid.  Want to know how?  By charging you a percentage of what they save you, sometimes as much as 25 percent according to Experian.com.  In the above example, that means $1,000 of the $4K discounted off the Capital One balance would be paid to the settlement company.

Also, the knock on your credit report for charge-off’s is significantly worse than just utilizing a consolidation company, and can take a decade to come off your report, says FairIsaac.com.

And didn’t I already mention the audacity it takes to justify paying less than what you actually, legitimately owe?  Sure, the credit card companies are rolling in it, and they often charge ridiculously high rates of interest.  Won’t hurt them much to contribute a little back to the common folk, right?  Perhaps, but it still ain’t right to pay $4,000 for an item you agreed to pay $8,000 for.  Period.

The truth is that you do not have to resort to such drastic measures, nor should you.  A little common-sense planning and spending reduction, following the advice of this blog and others like it that propose you handle your own issues prudently, and you can escape your debt much more quickly than it may seem now.

Forget consolidation, settlement, and other non-traditional methods.  Do the right thing, and pay your debt off as quickly as you can using good, savvy savings strategies.  You’ll feel a lot better about it, AND be fiscally better off as well.

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DISCLAIMER:  This post represents the author’s opinions only.  In no way should any part of the content of this post be interpreted as official financial advice, nor does it represent an intention to solicit readers into a specific company or investment.  Results are never guaranteed.  Utilize the information as you see fit, make all money decisions at your own risk.